Atlantic Ocean – December 12, 1943

Atlantic Ocean – December 12, 1943

    

B-24 Liberator  U.S. Air Force Photo

B-24 Liberator
U.S. Air Force Photo

     On December 12, 1943, a B-24 Liberator (42-7225) took off from Westover Field in Chicopee, Massachusetts, for a nighttime high altitude navigational and gunnery training flight over the Atlantic Ocean.  The aircraft was never seen again.

     The air crew was assigned to the 758th Bombardment Squadron, 459th Bomb Group.  

     The lost crewmen were listed as follows:

     (Pilot) Lt. William P. Masters

     (Co-Pilot) Lt. R. R. Hansen  (First name unknown)

     (Gunner) Sgt. Cecil H. Conklin

     (Gunner) Sgt. Anthony L. Greco

     (Gunner) Sgt. Dean G. McCaffrey

     (Radio Operator) Sgt. Bernard G. Stoeckley

     (Gunner) Sgt. Anson G. Wiseman

     (Flight Engineer) Sgt. Stanley E. Zajac

  

A bronze memorial plaque at the New England Air Museum honoring the lost crew of a B-24 Liberator (42-7225)

A bronze memorial plaque at the New England Air Museum honoring the lost crew of a B-24 Liberator (42-7225)

   A memorial to these men can be seen at the New England Air Museum in Winsor Locks, Connecticut.

     Click on image to enlarge.

     Source: 459th bombardment Group website

www.459bg.org/758th_squadron_servicemen.cfm

Lt. Jg. Kenneth B. McQuady Memorial

Lt. Jg. Kenneth B. McQuady Memorial

Quonset Air Museum

     Lt. Jg. McQuady was killed on March 2, 1945, when his F6F Hellcat crashed on takeoff from Charlestown Auxiliary Air Field in Charlestown, Rhode Island.   The propeller from his Hellcat was donated to the Quonset Air Museum in his memory.  

Quonset Air Museum Memorial to Lt. Jg. Kenneth Bruce McQuady

Quonset Air Museum Memorial to Lt. Jg. Kenneth Bruce McQuady

Description of accident that killed Lt. McQuady

Description of accident that killed Lt. McQuady

 

 

Charlestown Auxiliary Naval Airfield Memorial

Charlestown Auxiliary Naval Airfield Memorial

Charlestown, Rhode Island

    Charlestown Naval Auxiliary Field began operations in September of 1943.  Ensign George H. W. Bush trained there in 1944.  The field was decommissioned January 30, 1974, and is today known as Ninigret Park.   

     During its years of operation, 62 airmen lost their lives in accidents at the field.       

Memorial to the 62 men who lost their lives at Charlestown Auxiliary Field, Charlestown, R.I.

Memorial to the 62 men who lost their lives at Charlestown Auxiliary Field, Charlestown, R.I.

Names of those on the memorial. CLICK TO ENLARGE

Names of those on the memorial.
CLICK TO ENLARGE

Sign for Charlestown Auxiliary Landing Field  Charlestown, R.I.

Sign for Charlestown Auxiliary Landing Field
Charlestown, R.I.

  

Prinster-Hogg Park – Scituate, R.I.

Prinster-Hogg Park

Scituate, Rhode Island

    

A View of Prinster-Hogg Park, Scituate, R.I.

A View of Prinster-Hogg Park, Scituate, R.I.

     On February 21, 1982, Pilgrim Airlines Flight 458 took off from New York’s La Guardia Airport bound for Boston carrying several passengers and a crew of two; the pilot, Thomas N. Prinster, and co-pilot, Lyle W. Hogg.  As the plane was passing over Rhode Island a fire erupted in the cockpit due to a malfunction with the alcohol-fed de-icing system.  As flames burned their clothing away, and smoke choked their lungs, Prinster and Hogg remained at the controls  and successfully brought the plane down for a crash landing on the frozen Scituate Reservoir.  Though badly burned themselves, they assisted the passengers from the burning wreckage and led them to safety at the shore.   One passenger was lost, but the outcome could have ben far worse.    

 

Prinster-Hogg Park, Scituate R.I. Large Engraved Rock

Prinster-Hogg Park, Scituate R.I.
Large Engraved Rock

     Today a memorial to the incident can be found in Prinster-Hogg park located at the intersections of Routes 102, 14, and Rockland Road, (Known locally as “Crazy Corners”.) in Scituate, Rhode Island. 

     For a more detailed account of the accident refer to the book, “Rhode Island Disasters – Tales of Tragedy By Air, Sea And Rail.” by Jim Ignasher, published through The History Press. (2010)  

 

Prinster-Hogg Park, Scituate, Rhode Island. Engraved Memorial

Prinster-Hogg Park, Scituate, Rhode Island.
Engraved Memorial

     Book Cover RI Dis.

Wolf Hill Plane Crash Memorial

Wolf Hill Memorial – Georgiaville, Rhode Island 

     On August 5, 1943, three servicemen were killed when their Lockheed RB-34 aircraft crashed and burned on Wolf Hill in Gerogiaville, R.I.  (For more information, see “Georgiaville, RI – August 5, 1943” under “Rhode Island Military Aviation Accidents” on this website. )

     Two memorials were constructed to honor the men who lost their lives.  The first was erected in Deerfield Park, in the Greenville section of Smithfield, Rhode Island.  The second was erected at the crash site on Wolf Hill in the Georgiaville section of Smithfield.   

Memorial in Smithfield, R.I. dedicated to the three men who died in a military plane crash, August 5, 1943

Memorial in Smithfield, R.I. dedicated to the three men who died in a military plane crash, August 5, 1943

Memorial to three servicemen killed in a plane crash Aug. 5, 1943, Deerfield Park, Smithfield, R.I.

Memorial to three servicemen killed in a plane crash Aug. 5, 1943, Deerfield Park, Smithfield, R.I.

Monument honoring three servicemen killed in a military plane crash August 5, 1943 on Wolf Hill in Smithfield R.I.

Monument honoring three servicemen killed in a military plane crash August 5, 1943 on Wolf Hill in Smithfield R.I.

Granite tablet located on Wolf Hill, Smithfield, R.I.

Granite tablet located on Wolf Hill, Smithfield, R.I.

Mt. Holyoke B-24 Memorial

 

Mount Holyoke, Massachusetts – May 27, 1944

     On May 27, 1944, a B-24 J left Westover Field and struck the side of Mt. Holyoke.  All ten crewmen aboard were killed.  In may of 1989 a memorial was dedicated to honor those who lost their lives.

     For more information see an article written by Stan Freeman titled, “Lost Airmen Get Final Tribute” – The Sunday Republican, May 28, 1989.     

www.chromos-historical.org/mtholyoke/1989monument.html

Mount Holyoke, Massachusetts, B-24 Memorial.

Mount Holyoke, Massachusetts, B-24 Memorial.

Back Side of Mt. Holyoke B-24 Memorial. Photo Taken 2007

Back Side of Mt. Holyoke B-24 Memorial. Photo Taken 2007

Chester M. Spooner Building – North Central Airport

     Chester M. Spooner Memorial Building – North Central Airport

Smithfield, Rhode Island

    

Chester M. Spooner Memorial Building, North Central State Airport, Smithfield, R.I. (Photo taken 2007)

Chester M. Spooner Memorial Building, North Central State Airport, Smithfield, R.I. (Photo taken 2007)

     Chester M. Spooner was a native of Pawtucket, Rhode Island, and former publisher of the (Pawtucket) Evening Times, who was very influential in helping to make North Central Airport a reality.

     For more information about North Central Airport, see “Forgotten Tales Of North Central Airport” under Articles on this website.

Uxbridge Bomber Crash Memorial Site

     On May 18, 1944, a B-24 Liberator crashed in Uxbridge, Massachusetts, killing all crewmen aboard.  A memorial now exists on a two-acre parcel of land in the middle of a housing development where the bomber crashed.    For more information, see “The Uxbridge Bomber Crash” under “Aviation Accidents -Massachusetts – Military Accidents” on the website.

Uxbridge Bomber Memorial Site - August, 2012

Uxbridge Bomber Memorial Site – August, 2012

Memorial to those who lost their lives in the Uxbridge Bomber Crash - May 18, 1944.

Memorial to those who lost their lives in the Uxbridge Bomber Crash – May 18, 1944.

Pathway To Uxbridge Crash Memorial

For more information, see The Uxbridge Bomber Crash - May 18, 1944, under Massachusetts Military Aviation Accidents on the website.

Pathway leading to the Uxbridge Bomber memorial.

Uxbridge, Mass. Bomber Crash Memorial

Memorial to those who lost their lives in the Uxbridge Bomber Crash - May 18, 1944.

Memorial to those who lost their lives in the Uxbridge Bomber Crash – May 18, 1944.

Return to Top ▲Return to Top ▲