Martha’s Vineyard – March 25, 1944

Martha’s Vineyard – March 25, 1944 

 

TBF-1 Avenger
U. S. Navy Photo

     On the night of March 25, 1944, a navy TBF-1 Avenger, (Bu. No. 05880), was returning to the Martha’s Vineyard Naval Auxiliary Air Field after a night familiarization flight.   As the pilot was making his landing approach, he was waved off due to another aircraft which had just landed still being on the runway.  The Avenger circled around and came in for a second approach.  As it touched down it made a wheels up landing, and skidded on its belly for 900 feet before coming to rest.  The propeller, the bomb bay doors, and the starboard wing were heavily damaged, but there were no injuries.  

     The aircraft was assigned to VT-81.

     Source:

     U. S. Navy accident report #44-12653, dated March 25, 1944.  

Martha’s Vineyard, – January 2, 1945

Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts – January 2, 1945

 

TBF-1 Avenger
U. S. Navy Photo

     On January 2, 1945, a TBF-1C Avenger, (Bu. No. 24395), was landing at the Martha’s Vineyard Naval Air Station when the aircraft was hit with a strong crosswind while five feet from the ground.  The right wing fell and struck the runway causing the aircraft to crash-land.  The aircraft suffered significant damage, but the crew was not injured.

     Source: U. S. Navy accident report dated January 2, 1945 

Martha’s Vineyard – September 10, 1943

Martha’s Vineyard – September 10,1943

 

U.S. Navy SBD Dauntless
U.S. Navy Photo.

     On September 10, 1943, a pilot was practicing take-offs and landings  in a Douglas SBD-5 Dauntless, (Bu. No. 28216),  at the Martha’s Vineyard Navy Auxiliary Air Field.  While making an approach in cross winds, the aircraft crash-landed.  The aircraft was badly damaged but the pilot was not injured.

     The pilot was assigned to VC-43.

     Source:

     U. S. Navy report #44-8549, dated September 10, 1943.   

Martha’s Vineyard – March 5, 1946

Martha’s Vineyard – March 5, 1946

 

F8F Bearcat
U. S. Navy Photo

     On March 5, 1946, a flight of F8F-1 Bearcats left Quonset Point Naval Air Station in Rhode Island bound for Martha’s Vineyard Naval Air Station in Massachusetts.  The purpose of the flight was to practice mock carrier take-offs and landings.  As one of the aircraft, (Bu. No. 94827), was making a landing, it went off the runway and into soft dirt where it flipped on its back trapping the pilot.  The pilot was extricated with non-life-threatening injuries, and the aircraft suffered substantial damage.

     The aircraft was assigned to VF-18 at Quonset Point.

     Source:

     U. S. Navy accident report dated March 5, 1946.    

Atlantic Ocean – September 16, 1944

Atlantic Ocean – September 16, 1944

 

TBF-1 Avenger
U. S. Navy Photo

     On the afternoon of September 16, 1944, a Navy TBF-1C Avenger, (Bu. No. 47759), was taking part in a glide-bombing training exercise seven miles southwest of Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts.  Several other aircraft were also participating.  Each aircraft would make a run at the target from 5,000 feet at an angle of 45 degrees, and pull out of the dive at 1,200 to 1,500 feet, with a 2,000 yard interval maintained between planes.  

     The pilot of Bu. No. 47759 made four successful runs at the target.  On the fifth run, the aircraft was observed to make a 50 degree dive at the target from which it did not recover.  The aircraft plunged into the water just short of the dye marker and disappeared immediately.  No wreckage was recovered thereby leaving the cause of the accident unknown.   

     All aboard Bu. No. 47759 were killed.  

     The pilot: Ensign Townsend Doyle

     Radioman: ARM3c Theodore H. Jaffe

     Gunner: AOM3c Anthony N. Kulsa   

     The aircraft was assigned to VT-43.

     Source:

     U. S. Navy accident report dated September 16, 1944

 

Martha’s Vineyard, MA. – December 22, 1943

Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts – December 22, 1943

 

TBF-1 Avenger
U. S. Navy Photo

     On the afternoon of December 22, 1943, a TBF-1 Avenger, (Bu. No. 06209), was attempting to make an emergency landing due to engine trouble at Martha’s Vineyard Naval Air Station when the aircraft lost power and went into a wooded area near the end of Runway 24 and flipped on its back.  The pilot and one crew member received non-life-threatening injuries, but the aircraft was a total loss. 

     The cause of the accident was determined to be due to a missing bolt to the throttle control rod of the carburetor.     

     Source:

     U. S. Navy accident report #44-10433

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